Support clean burning wood-heaters

Less wood smoke means healthier air

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed new limits on harmful air pollution from new wood-burning devices. These devices, such as boilers, furnaces, and stoves, can subject a neighborhood to dangerous air pollution. Wood smoke, which contains soot, carbon monoxide, and other toxic air pollutants, can trigger asthma attacks, cause cancer, and even cut short lives.

Wood smoke can pollute a neighborhood and can travel miles away. That means people who live nearby and far away can suffer from inhaling wood smoke. Strong standards will help ensure that new wood burning devices are much cleaner and do not further pollute our air. EPA needs to adopt these long-overdue standards to protect our health and our neighborhoods from harmful wood smoke-related air pollutants.

To send a comment to EPA, click on the American Lung Association link: http://bit.ly/Rowbtg

Clean Air Board Community Meeting, March 7, 2013, 7 pm

“Looking Forward to Clean Air”

CAB will look at new developments under the federal Clean Air Act and under state regulations.  Arleen Shulman, former air resources planning chief at the state Department of Environmental Protection will speak to the board.

This meeting will be held at the Second Presbyterian Church, 528 Garland Drive, Carlisle, PA 17013, on March 7,  at 7 pm.   Join us for a discussion of this important topic.

Clean Air Board Community Meeting, Sept. 1, 2011, 7 pm

“Is IdleAir Making a Comeback in Central Pennsylvania?”

Cynthia Perthuis will provide an update about efforts to restore IdleAir service to central Pennsylvania.  IdleAir allows truck drivers to turn off their diesel engines and still enjoy heating, cooling, standard electric inside and outside the cab.

The presentation will be held at the Second Presbyterian Church, 528 Garland Drive, Carlisle, PA 17013, on Sept. 1, at 7 pm.   Join us for a discussion of this important topic and other air quality issues.

Read the article in the Carlisle Sentinel:  http://www.cumberlink.com/news/local/article_4155fee2-d511-11e0-93e9-001cc4c002e0.html?mode=story

Clean Air Board Community Meeting, June 2, 2011, 7 pm

“Reducing Diesel Particulate Emissions from Construction Projects”

CAB will look at successful projects which reduced particulate emissions from diesel engines at construction sites.

The presentation will be held at the Second Presbyterian Church, 528 Garland Drive, Carlisle, PA 17013, on June 2, at 7 pm.   Join us for a discussion of this important topic.

The Diesel Powered Motor Vehicle Idling Act – General Restriction on Idling

Section 3.  Restrictions on idling.

(a) Restrictions.–No driver or owner of a diesel-powered motor vehicle with a gross vehicle weight of 10,001 pounds or more engaged in commerce shall cause and no owner or operator of the location where the vehicle loads, unloads or parks shall allow the engine of the vehicle to idle for more than five minutes in any continuous 60-minute period, except as provided under subsections (b) and (c).

(b) Exclusions.–The idling restrictions set forth in subsection (a) do not apply to motor homes, commercial implements of husbandry, implements of husbandry, farm equipment or farm vehicles.

(c) Exemptions.–A diesel-powered motor vehicle with a gross weight of 10,001 pounds or more may idle beyond the time allowed in subsection (a) for one or more of the following reasons:

(1) When a vehicle idles while forced to remain motionless because of on-highway traffic, an official traffic control device or signal or at the direction of a law enforcement official.

(2) When a vehicle must idle to operate defrosters, heaters, air conditioners or cargo refrigeration equipment, or to install equipment, in order to prevent a safety or health emergency and not for the purpose of a rest period, or as otherwise necessary to comply with manufacturers’ operating requirements, specifications and warranties in accordance with Federal or State motor carrier safety regulations or local requirements.

(3) When a police, fire, ambulance, public safety, military, utility service vehicle or other emergency or law enforcement vehicle or any vehicle being used in an emergency or public safety capacity shall idle while in an emergency or training mode and not for the convenience of the driver.

(4) When the primary propulsion engine idles for maintenance, particulate matter trap regeneration, servicing or repair of the vehicle or for vehicle diagnostic purposes, if idling is required for that activity.

(5) When a vehicle idles as part of a Federal or State inspection to verify that all equipment is in good working order, if idling is required as part of the inspection.

(6) When idling of a primary propulsion engine is necessary to power work-related mechanical, safety or electrical operations other than propulsion. This exemption shall not apply when idling is done for cabin comfort or to operate nonessential onboard equipment.

(7) When idling of a primary propulsion engine is necessary as part of a security inspection either entering or exiting a facility.

(8) When an armored vehicle must idle when a person remains inside the vehicle to guard contents or while the vehicle is being loaded or unloaded.

(9) When a vehicle must idle due to mechanical difficulties over which the driver has no control, if the vehicle owner submits the repair paperwork or product repair verifying that the mechanical problem has been fixed, by mail to the department within 30 days of the repair.

(10) When a bus, school bus or school vehicle must idle to provide heating or air conditioning when non-driver passengers are onboard. For the purposes of this exemption, the bus, school bus or school vehicle may idle for no more than a total of 15 minutes in a continuous 60-minute period, except when idling is necessary to maintain a safe temperature for students with special needs who are transported by a school bus or school vehicle.

(11) An occupied vehicle with a sleeper-berth compartment that idles for purposes of air conditioning or heating during a rest or sleep period and the outside temperature at the location of the vehicle is less than 40 degrees or greater than 75 degrees Fahrenheit at any time during the rest or sleep period. This applies to a motor vehicle subject to this act parked in any place that the vehicle is legally permitted to park, including but not limited to, a fleet trucking terminal, commercial truck stop or designated rest area. This exemption expires May 1, 2010. This exemption does not apply if the vehicle is parked at a location equipped with stationary idle reduction technology that is available for use at the start of the rest period.

(12) When idling is necessary for sampling, weighing, active loading or active unloading or for an attended motor vehicle waiting for sampling, weighing, loading or unloading. For the purposes of this exemption, the vehicle may idle for up to a total of 15 minutes in any continuous 60-minute period.

(13) When idling by a school bus or school vehicle off school property during queuing for the sequential discharge or pickup of students is necessary because the physical configuration of a school or the school’s surrounding streets does not allow for stopping.

(14) When idling is necessary for maintaining safe operating conditions while waiting for a police escort when transporting a load that requires the issuance of a permit in accordance with 75 Pa.C.S. Ch. 49 Subch. D (relating to special permits for excessive size and weight).

(15) When actively engaged in solid waste collection or the collection of source-separated recyclable materials. This exemption does not apply when a vehicle is not actively engaged in solid waste collection or the collection of source-separated recyclable materials.

(d) Exception.–The restriction on idling set forth in subsection (a) does not apply to a diesel-powered motor vehicle that exhibits a label issued by the California Air Resources Board under 13 CCR § 1956.8(a)(6)(C) (relating to exhaust emissions standards and test procedures – 1985 and subsequent model heavy- duty engines and vehicles) showing that the vehicle’s engine meets the optional NOx idling emission standard.

SEE CAB LIBRARY FOR FULL TEXT OF THE LAW

PA Turnpike Opens No-Idle, Clean-Air Facility For Truckers at New Stanton Service Plaza June 4th

Pa. Turnpike Opens First No-Idle, Clean-Air Facility For Truckers at New Stanton Service Plaza Today

Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission Press Release

Truck Stop Electrification facility will help truckers comply with no-idling law.

Excerpt:

Truck Stop Electrification facility (Ohio Environmental Council)

NEW STANTON, PA (06/04/2010)(readMedia)– The Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission (PTC) had a ribbon cutting ceremony earlier today to mark the opening of a Truck Stop Electrification (TSE) facility at its New Stanton Service Plaza at milepost 77.6 off the westbound lanes of I-76 in Westmoreland County.

The TSE, developed by CabAire LLC, Enfield, Conn., is comprised of towers equipped with modules that fit into truck cab windows to provide heat, air conditioning, internet, TV and electrical power to trucks and other diesel-powered vehicles while the engine is shut off.

Cost to use a TSE module will be about the same as a gallon of diesel fuel per hour. CabAire has agreed to provide the service free of charge for 30-days, from June 4 to July 4.

“We are incredibly proud to have constructed this facility – presently the only one of its kind in the state – on the Pennsylvania Turnpike,” said Turnpike CEO Joe Brimmeier. “This TSE is designed to help reduce pollution and land-development impacts to the neighborhoods surrounding our travel plaza, and it’s just one of several steps we’re taking to provide a greener environment.”

More about how to reduce idling from the US Department of Energy Idle Reduction Portal.

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