Clean Air Board Community Meeting, June 2, 2011, 7 pm

“Reducing Diesel Particulate Emissions from Construction Projects”

CAB will look at successful projects which reduced particulate emissions from diesel engines at construction sites.

The presentation will be held at the Second Presbyterian Church, 528 Garland Drive, Carlisle, PA 17013, on June 2, at 7 pm.   Join us for a discussion of this important topic.

Nano Pollution and Health (Video)

Nano Pollution and Health

February 21, 2008 — Scientists find that air pollution is even worse for you than previously thought. As this ScienCentral News video explains, new research shows how tiny particles from vehicle emissions can cause heart disease and other problems.

Sponsored by the National Science Foundation.

A Breath of Air: What Pollution is Doing to Our Children (Video)

This clip discusses the findings of the Children’s Health Study by the Southern California.

Excerpt: “In healthy children, lungs grow as the body develops, but the greatest growth rate is during puberty. From ages 10-14, healthy children see their lungs grow by about 12% each year. By the late teens or early twenties, lungs have essentially stopped growing. The Children’s Health Study shows that during the crucial puberty years, the lungs of a child exposed to high levels of pollution will grow 10% less each year. Over a period of four years, that is a significant deficit in lung function compared with kids growing up in low-pollution neighborhoods.”

Particulate Air Pollution Affects Heart, Research Finds: Science Daily

Particulate Air Pollution Affects Heart, Research Finds

ScienceDaily (May 20, 2010) — Breathing polluted air increases stress on the heart’s regulation capacity, up to six hours after inhalation of combustion-related small particles called PM2.5, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers.

Stress on the heart from exposure to high levels of PM2.5 may contribute to cardiovascular disease, said Duanping Liao, professor of public health sciences.

The body’s ability to properly regulate heartbeat so the heart can pump the appropriate amounts of blood into the circulation system relies on the stability of the heart’s electrical activity, called electrophysiology.

“Air pollution is associated with cardiopulmonary mortality and morbidity, and it is generally accepted that impaired heart electrophysiology is one of the underlying mechanisms,” said Fan He, master’s program graduate, Department of Public Health Sciences, Penn State College of Medicine. “This impairment is exhibited through fluctuations in the heart rate from beat to beat over an established period of time, known as heart rate variability. It is also exhibited through a longer period for the electric activity to return to the baseline, known as ventricular repolarization.

“The time course, how long it would take from exposure to cardiac response, has not been systematically investigated,” said He. “We conducted this study to investigate the relationship between particle matter and heart electrophysiology impairment, especially the time course.”

The researchers published their results in recent issues of the Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology and in Environmental Health Perspectives.

Liao’s team of researchers studied 106 people from central Pennsylvania, mostly in the Harrisburg metropolitan area. Nonsmokers over the age of 45 without severe cardiac problems wore air-quality and heart-rate monitors for 24 hours. The devices recorded data in one-minute intervals.

Results indicate that heart electrophysiology was affected up to six hours after elevated PM2.5 exposure. These adverse effects may trigger the onset of acute cardiac events and over time may result in increased risk of chronic heart disease.

PM2.5 refers to particles up to 2.5 micrometers in size. Their primary sources are diesel engine and coal combustion outdoors; and oil, gas or wood combustion for cooking and heating indoors. PM2.5 levels are regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Restricting PM2.5: A Sure Way to Improve America’s Health: Tami Biddle, CAB

Restricting PM2.5: A Sure Way to Improve America’s Health (952 KB)

by Tami Biddle

Clean Air Board of Central Pennsylvania

October 2008

Study: Pollution is bad for your heart: Sentinel News

May 28, 2010: Sentinel News

Study: Pollution is bad for your heart

by Greg Gross

Excerpt:

Members of the Clean Air Board of Central Pennsylvania weren’t surprised by a recent study conducted in the area by Penn State researchers.

Penn State College of Medicine researchers found that exposure to high levels of PM2.5 increases stress on the heart’s regulation capacity well after the pollutants had been inhaled.

“It’s certainly a concern,” Duane Fickeisen, treasurer of the CAB.

But, he added, the findings were what he expected.

Stress on the heart from exposure to high levels of PM2.5 may contribute to cardiovascular disease, said Duanping Liao, professor of public health sciences at Penn State, in a news release from the school.

In June, Liao will present his findings during a CAB meeting, said Thomas Au, president of the Carlisle-based group.

Liao’s team of researchers studied 106 people from central Pennsylvania, mostly in the Harrisburg metropolitan area. Nonsmokers over the age of 45 without severe cardiac problems wore air-quality and heart-rate monitors for 24 hours. The devices recorded data in one-minute intervals, the news release says.

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