Clean Air Board Community Meeting, June 2, 2011, 7 pm

“Reducing Diesel Particulate Emissions from Construction Projects”

CAB will look at successful projects which reduced particulate emissions from diesel engines at construction sites.

The presentation will be held at the Second Presbyterian Church, 528 Garland Drive, Carlisle, PA 17013, on June 2, at 7 pm.   Join us for a discussion of this important topic.

Air Pollution: A Medical Perspective (Video)

In this video, Philip D. Carey, MD discusses the dangers of PM2.5 to the health of our nation. Dr. Carey gives particular focus to the residents of Cumberland County, PA. Cumberland County has been ranked the 24th most polluted county in the United States based on the level of PM2.5.

Diesel Pollution, School Buses and Children’s Health (Video)

Diesel Pollution, School Buses and Children’s Health

Air Pollution from diesel vehicles can affect everyone, especially children.

Video produced by the PA Department of Environmental Protection

A Breath of Air: What Pollution is Doing to Our Children (Video)

This clip discusses the findings of the Children’s Health Study by the Southern California.

Excerpt: “In healthy children, lungs grow as the body develops, but the greatest growth rate is during puberty. From ages 10-14, healthy children see their lungs grow by about 12% each year. By the late teens or early twenties, lungs have essentially stopped growing. The Children’s Health Study shows that during the crucial puberty years, the lungs of a child exposed to high levels of pollution will grow 10% less each year. Over a period of four years, that is a significant deficit in lung function compared with kids growing up in low-pollution neighborhoods.”

Cumberland County Physicians Resolution: The Air We Breathe

The following August 2005 public letter was signed by over three-quarters of Cumberland County physicians.

CUMBERLAND COUNTY PHYSICIANS RESOLUTION: THE AIR WE BREATHE

In 1970, Congress passed the Clean Air Act that required each state to achieve air quality standards as set by the Environment Protection Agency (EPA) by 1977. Although improvement has been achieved nationwide with respect to air quality, Cumberland County does not comply with current standards for ozone and fine particulate matter.

The American Lung Association (ALA) ranks Cumberland Country’s atmosphere as the 24th most polluted area in the United States, comparable to New York City.*

Due to the concentration of truck traffic in Cumberland County, fine particulate pollution from diesel exhaust is much higher than in most places and is astronomical along the “Miracle Mile” in Middlesex Township.

Diesel exhaust is a mixture of particulate matter, gases and chemical compounds containing 40 known environmental contaminants. Fine particulate matter (PM 2.5) consists largely of carbon (soot) to which other chemical substances bind. As we breathe, these tiny particles carrying toxic substances enter our lungs and are deposited in the deepest recesses of our lung tissue. Some of these toxic substances can cause cancer or other adverse health effects.

Breathing diesel emissions containing these fine particles can result in exacerbation of lung disease, i.e. asthma and emphysema, and can precipitate heart attacks. Populations at particular risk include infants, children and the elderly with pre-existing heart and lung disease. In addition, diesel exhaust is known to contain three carcinogens that cause lung and bladder cancer. According to ALA reports, scientists estimate that 50,000 to 100,000 people die each year as a result of air pollution. Studies have shown that children exposed to diesel exhaust exhibit abnormal lung development which appears to be permanent.

The construction of additional distribution parks will undoubtedly bring more diesel trucks into the area and will have public health implications. Carlisle already is a “hot spot” of diesel pollution.

We acknowledge that the trucking industry is vital to our way of life and to the economy. We have benefited from it as much as anyone and do not advocate eliminating the trucking industry. However, we also believe that proper and insightful environmental planning is essential for our community’s future and its health and well-being.

As the American Lung Association slogan states:

“When you can’t breathe, nothing else really matters!”

*Based on 24-hour PM 2.5 measurements.

The foregoing is authored by Dr. Phil Carey and agreed to by:

Adam C. Abram, MD

Ali Ahmed, MD

David P. Albright, MD

Edwin A. Aquino, MD

Daniel M. Armesto, MD

Ramesh Arora , MD

Shiv S. Aggarwal, MD

William Bachinsky, MD

Bruce. O Bailey, MD

David C. Baker, MD

Michael J. Banach, MD

Sherma B. Bharucha, MD

Gary L. Blacksmith, Jr., MD

Richard N. Blutstein, MD

Todd A. Bokelman, MD

T. Alex Boshnakov, MD

Joseph Brazel, MD

D. Shaun Bryant, MD

Howard W. Burkett, DPM

David Calcagno, MD

Joseph J. Campbell, MD

Philip D. Carey, MD

John Caruso, DO

David P. Chernicoff, DP

Howard R. Cohen, MD

Johnson G. Coyle, MD

J. Edward Dagen, MD

Faith Daggs, MD

Michael Daniels, MD

H. R. Davis, MD

Lisa M. Davis, MD

Richard L. Davis, MD

William E. Demuth, Jr., MD

George W. Ehly, MD

David B. Evans, MD

Katarzyna Ferraro , MD

Thomas S. Filip, MD

Thomas J. Green, MD

L. Greer, DPM

Darryl Guistwite, DO

Kenneth R. Guistwite, MD

J. L. Hardesty, MD

Richard C. Harker, MD

Jeffrey H. Harris, MD

David L. Hartzell, MD

Creston C. Herold, Jr., MD

Daniel P. Hely, MD

Webb S. Hersperger, MD

Louis Hieb MD

Mohammad Ismail, MD

Russell R. Janson, MD

William K. Jenkins, DDS

James R. Johnston, III, MD

Marion N. Johnston, MD

John C. Jurgenson, MD

Sharad K. Khetarpal MD

Serge Kolev, MD

Donald J. Kovacs, MD

Stephen J. Krebs, MD

Robert Lasek, MD

Gregory L. Lewis, MD

John G. Loeffler, MD

Wallace A. Longton, MD

Michael E. Lupinacci, MD

Russell Macaluso, MD

Ronald G. Mangan, DMD

Robert E. Martin, MD

David S. Masland, MD

Allan Mira, MD

George K. Moffitt, Jr., MD

Barry Moore, MD

Thomas C. O’Malley, MD

Louis Myers MD

Michael J. Oplinger, MD

George P. Ong, MD

Roger H. Ostdahl, MD

Maria Papoutsis, MD

William J. Phelan, MD

Mark Pinker, DPM

Joseph A. Pion, DO

Larry S. Rankin, MD

Kent R. Rentschler, DMD

Keith S. Rice, MD

Carol Robison, DO

Noelle, Rotondo, DO

Ronald Schlansky, MD

William L. Shelley, MD

Michael F. Smith, MD

A. Sposic, MD

Bruce H. Spivak, DMD

L. M. Stankovic, MD

Drew Stoken, MD

Leon Sweer, MD

David I. Thompson, MD

J. B. Tocks, MD

Jay A. Townsend, MD

E. Violago, MD

Timothy P. Walsh MD

David L. Wampler, MD

William J. West, Sr., MD

Willis W. Willard, MD

Raymond J. Wiss, MD

Bradford J. Wood, MD

James A. Yates, MD

James P. Yeager, MD

John P. Zornosa, M

Clean Air Resolution: Cumberland County, PA

CLEAN AIR RESOLUTION

Resolution Regarding Air Quality in Cumberland County

Authored by the Clean Air Board of Central Pennsylvania

ADD YOUR NAME TO THE RESOLUTION

SEE CURRENT SIGNERS

Whereas,

pollution from diesel engine emissions has been proven to be harmful to our health. Diesel exhaust can contain 40 hazardous air pollutants, 15 of which are known human carcinogens. Fine particles from diesel emissions have been linked to heart attacks, asthma, stroke, stunted lung growth and premature death. Children and seniors are at the greatest risk from these emissions1; and

Whereas,

air quality has been shown to be especially degraded in Cumberland County and EPA has designated the County as being in non-attainment of fine particle (PM 2.5) and ozone standards. The average lifetime diesel soot cancer risk here is 393 times greater than the accepted EPA cancer level of one in one million2. Cumberland County is among the 2% most polluted counties in the nation for fine particle pollution3; and

Whereas,

in August 2005 more than 100 doctors in the region submitted a paid advertisement to local media citing statistics about air pollution and attributing the problem primarily to fine particle pollution from diesel exhaust and the heavy concentration of trucks in the area; and

Whereas,

“the earth is the Lord’s, and all that is in it,” as the Psalmist says, and human beings are called to be responsible stewards of God’s creation;

Therefore, the undersigned members of the Cumberland County faith community hereby ask that:

1. Planning and municipal authorities in Cumberland County take air quality factors into account in land use planning decisions, particularly with regard to diesel trucks and buses that contribute to air quality degradation.

2. Cumberland County enact ordinances to limit air pollution from the idling of diesel-powered vehicles.

3. Truck facilities in Cumberland County implement programs to reduce diesel emissions, including installation of electrification units to eliminate the need for extensive diesel-powered truck idling.

4. School districts in Cumberland County enact policies limiting school bus idling and aggressively pursue grant funding and programs to retrofit and upgrade school bus diesel engines with devices to help control harmful emissions.

CITATIONS

1. Clean Air Task Force, “Diesel and Health in America,” February 2005. Available online at http://www.catf.us/publications/view/83

2. Clean Air Task Force, Diesel Project. Available at http://www.catf.us/projects/diesel/

3. American Lung Association, “State of the Air 2005.” Available online at http://lungaction.org/reports/stateoftheair2005.html

4. The Sentinel: Carlisle, PA. August 23, 2005

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