Science: The Polluted Brain

The Polluted Brain by Emily Underwood

Science  27 Jan 2017:
Vol. 355, Issue 6323, pp. 342-345
DOI: 10.1126/science.355.6323.342

Some of the health risks of inhaling fine and ultrafine pollutant particles are well-established, such as asthma, lung cancer, and, most recently, heart disease. But a growing body of evidence suggests that such exposure can also harm the brain, accelerating cognitive aging, and may even increase risk of Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia. The link between air pollution and dementia remains controversial—even its proponents warn that more research is needed to confirm a causal connection and work out just how the particles might enter the brain and make mischief there. But a growing number of epidemiological studies from around the world, new findings from animal models and human brain imaging studies, and increasingly sophisticated techniques for modeling PM2.5 exposures have raised alarms.

Read more from Science: http://science.sciencemag.org/content/355/6323/342

Carbon Fee and Dividend Resolution

Update:  On March 9, the Carlisle Borough Council passed a resolution proposed by Dickinson College students that calls for the U.S. Congress to limit climate change by exploring a national carbon fee and dividend.
Support the carbon fee and dividend resolution at the Borough of Carlisle Council meeting on March 9.
CAB supports the initiative taken by Dickinson College students urging the Borough of Carlisle to adopt a resolution to urge Congress to address climate change and explore a carbon fee and dividend policy.  While there are many ways to reduce carbon pollution and protect the public health, the carbon fee and dividend policy is a promising solution.  The resolution does not impose any cost to the Borough and is directed toward our Congressional representatives.
The full resolution can be found here.

You may contact Borough Council through its Secretary,  Joyce Stone, at jstone@carlislepa.org 

You may also attend the Borough Council meeting on March 9, 2017, at 7 pm to show your support.

Clean Air Board Community Meeting March 2, 7 pm

We will discuss two topics:

The future of rural Cumberland County. The Cumberland Conservation Collaborative is planning a forum on the forces and factors that will shape the future of rural Cumberland County.  CAB  will participate in this forum.  Share your concerns.

Carbon Fees and Dividend Policy.  Natalie McNeil, Dickinson College student, will explain a proposal that she is presenting to the Carlisle Borough Council.

Join us at the Second Presbyterian Church in Carlisle, 528 Garland Drive, Carlisle. March 2, 7-8pm.  The meeting room is the chapel (on your right side as you enter). Garland Drive is just south of Exit 45, Interstate 81 in Carlisle.

Keeping bees and other pollinators safe and happy

Rusty patched bumble beeSource: US Fish and Wildlife Service Fact Sheet

On Feb. 2, 7 pm, the Clean Air Board is hosting a program on examining the threats to our bee population and the ways to enhance our gardens and grounds to attract pollinators.   Dawn Toutkaldjian a bee keeper from PennApic (Pennsylvania Apiculture) will talk about the environmental threats to our bee population and how to reduce those threats.  Ann Markley from the Penn-Cumberland Garden Club will discuss how to reshape our gardens and grounds to make them pollinator-friendly.

Join us at the Second Presbyterian Church in Carlisle, 528 Garland Drive, Carlisle.  Feb. 2, 7-8pm.  The meeting room is the chapel (on your right side as you enter). Garland Drive is just south of Exit 45, Interstate 81 in Carlisle.

Clean Air Board meeting Jan. 5

The Clean Air Board will be meeting Jan. 5, 7 pm at the Second Presbyterian Church in Carlisle.   Join us to discuss new development around Carlisle and the steps municipalities can take to ensure a healthy quality of life.

The Second Presbyterian Church is located at 528 Garland Drive, Carlisle, PA  17013.

 

Breathe less … or ban cars: cities have radically different responses to pollution

When thick smog recently hit, Londoners were advised to avoid exercise, while Parisians got free public transport. Which is the best solution?

When a thick cloud of air pollution settled in over London last week, experts warned those with health problems to avoid strenuous exercise. The advice to Londoners essentially boiled down to this: breathe less.

Meanwhile, as Paris suffered a similar pollution episode – its worst in a decade – officials swung into action, waiving charges for public transport and restricting the number of cars allowed on roads, alternately barring those with odd and even license plates.

At the same time Paris mayor Anne Hidalgo joined officials from Madrid, Athens and Mexico City in announcing plans to get all diesel vehicles off the roads by 2025. Diesel is highly polluting, emitting far greater amounts of dangerous nitrogen dioxide and tiny pollution particles than petrol, and can cause cancer to heart attacks.

Read more … The Guardian

Paris Air Pollution

Paris bans cars for second day running as pollution chokes city

From the Guardian, Dec. 7, 2016

Vehicles with odd-number plates were banned on Tuesday and, on Wednesday, it was the even numbers’ turn

Grey Paris: the Eiffel Tower in the smog.
Grey Paris: the Eiffel Tower in the smog. Photograph: Thomas Samson/AFP/Getty Images

Paris authorities restricted traffic in the city for a second day after a “lid of pollution” sealed the capital, causing concern over public health.

Photographs showed a grey veil of dirty air trapped over the city, masking the horizon and, at times, landmarks such as the Eiffel Tower. Experts said it was the longest most intense spike in pollution for at least 10 years and was expected to continue for at least another day if not longer.

Read more: The Guardian