Carbon Fee and Dividend Resolution

Update:  On March 9, the Carlisle Borough Council passed a resolution proposed by Dickinson College students that calls for the U.S. Congress to limit climate change by exploring a national carbon fee and dividend.
Support the carbon fee and dividend resolution at the Borough of Carlisle Council meeting on March 9.
CAB supports the initiative taken by Dickinson College students urging the Borough of Carlisle to adopt a resolution to urge Congress to address climate change and explore a carbon fee and dividend policy.  While there are many ways to reduce carbon pollution and protect the public health, the carbon fee and dividend policy is a promising solution.  The resolution does not impose any cost to the Borough and is directed toward our Congressional representatives.
The full resolution can be found here.

You may contact Borough Council through its Secretary,  Joyce Stone, at jstone@carlislepa.org 

You may also attend the Borough Council meeting on March 9, 2017, at 7 pm to show your support.
Advertisements

Air Quality Action Day declared for Susquehanna Valley on Thursday, Jan 7

Air Quality Action Day has been declared for Susquehanna Valley, PA, on Thursday, Jan 7
Tomorrow’s Forecast
Thursday, Jan 7: 105 AQI Unhealthy for Sensitive Groups Particle Pollution (2.5 microns)

Extended Forecast
Friday, Jan 8: 100 AQI Moderate Particle Pollution (2.5 microns)
Current Conditions: As of 2 PM on Wednesday, sunny skies persist over the region as a ridge of high pressure remains centered across the eastern US. The persistence of this ridge over our area has contributed to light winds and a rise in temperatures today. In fact, temperatures are approaching the 40 degree mark. The combination of the light winds and warmer temperatures has also allowed PM 2.5 levels to rise into the moderate range. With even warmer air building in tomorrow, expect PM 2.5 levels to peak near the Code YELLOW / Code ORANGE threshold. *** Thursday’s Forecast: So for Thursday, expect mostly sunny skies to persist once again as the ridge of high pressure remains in place across the eastern US. This ridge will allow for clear conditions during the morning hours. The clear conditions will, in turn, allow the ground to radiatively cool, reducing temperatures into the 10s. With relatively no wind to speak of, expect there to be limited mixing near the surface, increasing PM 2.5 levels across the area. An inversion will remain in place for much of the day, keeping PM 2.5 levels elevated near the Code YELLOW / Code ORANGE threshold, even as temperatures rise into the low 40s. This is why an Air Quality Action Day for PM 2.5 has been issued for the Susquehanna Valley region of PA. ***

This forecast is brought to you by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PA DEP) and the Air Quality Partnership of the Susquehanna Valley.

* To find out more information about the Air Quality Partnership of the Susquehanna Valley, visit the AQP of SV Website.

 

CAB guest editorial in the Sentinel

The American Lung Association’s “State of the Air” report for 2015 contained some daunting news for Central Pennsylvania: the Harrisburg-York-Lebanon region was listed as 12th worst in the nation for particle pollution.

This seems like a dramatic slide in the wrong direction; in the 2014 report our region had been listed as 33rd worst in the nation in this category. Is our air dramatically worse than it has been in the past?

On June 19, 2015 the Sentinel published CAB’s view of the data.  For the full text of the guest editorial, go to: Sentinel – CAB guest editorial

Air Quality Action Day has been declared for Susquehanna Valley on Friday, Jun 21

 Forecast
Friday, Jun 21: 105 AQI Unhealthy for Sensitive Groups Ozone
70 AQI Moderate Particle Pollution (2.5 microns)

Extended Forecast
Saturday, Jun 22: 112 AQI Unhealthy for Sensitive Groups Ozone
80 AQI Moderate Particle Pollution (2.5 microns)

Here are some Air Quality Action Day tips you can follow to help reduce pollution:

Days when ozone levels are expected to be high:

* Conserve electricity and set your air conditioner at a higher temperature.
* Choose a cleaner commute—share a ride to work or use public transportation. Bicycle or walk to errands when possible.
* Refuel cars and trucks after dusk.
* Combine errands and reduce trips.
* Limit engine idling.
* Use household, workshop, and garden chemicals in ways that keep evaporation to a minimum, or try to delay using them when poor air quality is forecast.

This forecast is brought to you by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PA DEP) and the Air Quality Partnership of the Susquehanna Valley.

 

Clean Air Board Community Meeting, Sept. 1, 2011, 7 pm

“Is IdleAir Making a Comeback in Central Pennsylvania?”

Cynthia Perthuis will provide an update about efforts to restore IdleAir service to central Pennsylvania.  IdleAir allows truck drivers to turn off their diesel engines and still enjoy heating, cooling, standard electric inside and outside the cab.

The presentation will be held at the Second Presbyterian Church, 528 Garland Drive, Carlisle, PA 17013, on Sept. 1, at 7 pm.   Join us for a discussion of this important topic and other air quality issues.

Read the article in the Carlisle Sentinel:  http://www.cumberlink.com/news/local/article_4155fee2-d511-11e0-93e9-001cc4c002e0.html?mode=story

Clean Air Board Community Meeting, June 2, 2011, 7 pm

“Reducing Diesel Particulate Emissions from Construction Projects”

CAB will look at successful projects which reduced particulate emissions from diesel engines at construction sites.

The presentation will be held at the Second Presbyterian Church, 528 Garland Drive, Carlisle, PA 17013, on June 2, at 7 pm.   Join us for a discussion of this important topic.

Carlisle Road Diet Implementation

Work is expected to begin on implementation of the Carlisle Borough road diet next month, according to a report made to the Borough Council this week. The traffic calming plan, which CAB supports and helped fund, involves changing the two main thoroughfares in town (Hanover and High Streets) from two narrow travel lanes in each direction to one lane each way.

There will be dedicated left-turn lanes at cross streets and bike lanes as well as more room for maneuvering in and out of parking places. With smart signals and the dedicated left-turn lanes, the engineers project that traffic flow will be at least as good as it is now. Since pedestrians will only have to cross three lanes (one travel lane each direction and the left-turn lane), those of us who walk will be able to cross the street more quickly, reducing the time needed for “walk” signals.

The net result is expected to make Carlisle more pedestrian and bike friendly, result in a more pleasant center-of-town experience, and still provide efficient travel and emergency access through town.