AIR QUALITY ACTION DAY HAS BEEN DECLARED FOR FRIDAY, JUN 12

The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection has declared an Air Quality Action Day for the Susquehanna Valley on Friday, June 12

 Forecast
Friday, Jun 12: 103 AQI Unhealthy for Sensitive Groups Ozone
81 AQI Moderate Particle Pollution (2.5 microns)

Extended Forecast
Saturday, Jun 13: 79 AQI Moderate Ozone
76 AQI Moderate Particle Pollution (2.5 microns)
Current Conditions: At 2 p.m. EDT this Thursday afternoon, hot and humid conditions exist across the region south of a nearly stationary cold front moving across northern parts of Pennsylvania. Already, ozone is moving well into the moderate range, and some spots will even average code ORANGE before the day is out. Temperatures are rising close to 90 degrees as well. With the higher humidity levels, and some smoke still present in the boundary layer, fine particulate is also well into the moderate range. A thunderstorm can pop in a few spots later this afternoon and evening, otherwise partly cloudy and humid overnight. *** Friday’s forecast: Hot and humid conditions will continue on southwest winds for the day Friday. Parts of the area will experience code ORANGE ozone levels by the afternoon hours. Afternoon temperatures will soar into the lower 90s. With a decent amount of humidity and lighter winds, fine particulate will remain well into the moderate range. A thunderstorm may be sparked in the late afternoon or early evening, but may not be enough to limit ozone formation. *** Extended forecast: A stronger cold front will be moving southeastward towards the area on Saturday, increasing shower and thunderstorm coverage across the area. Ozone concentrations should thus fall into the lower moderate range. Afternoon temperatures in the middle to upper 80s with a decent amount of humidity and light winds keeping PM2.5 in the moderate range. High pressure will move southward into the area on Sunday, and bring more of an north to northeast flow which will act to keep ozone concentrations in the lower moderate range. Southwest flow out ahead of another cold front on Monday will act to keep ozone in the moderate range, with a couple of afternoon and evening thunderstorms. With upper level ridging and winds shifting back into the southwest, ozone levels may increase later on next week as hot and humid conditions return.—McAuliffe
Here are some Air Quality Action Day tips you can follow to help reduce pollution:

Days when ozone levels are expected to be high:

* Conserve electricity and set your air conditioner at a higher temperature.
* Choose a cleaner commute—share a ride to work or use public transportation. Bicycle or walk to errands when possible.
* Refuel cars and trucks after dusk.
* Combine errands and reduce trips.
* Limit engine idling.
* Use household, workshop, and garden chemicals in ways that keep evaporation to a minimum, or try to delay using them when poor air quality is forecast.

Clean Air Board comments on EPA’s proposed ozone standard

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is required by law to review and adjust its public health standards for critical air pollutants every five years.  This review is based on the latest scientific and medical information.  Last November, EPA proposed to move to an 8-hour exposure standard for ozone between 60 and 70 ppb (parts per billion) in the ambient air.

The current public health standard is 75 ppb.  If a new standard is adopted, the public would alerted to more “bad air” days — days during which the air quality is worse than the ozone standard.  These air quality action days would occur during the warmer months, when pollutants bake in the atmosphere to form ground level ozone.

Our members include many people who suffer ailments from breathing polluted air.  The Cumberland Valley is at the receiving end of an ozone transport corridor which originates hundreds of miles away.  Even on days when an ozone alert has not been declared, people can and do suffer respiratory problems due to ozone.

In our letter to EPA, we highlighted some of the more recent scientific and medical studies supporting a more stringent ozone standard. Many of these studies have identified strong links between long-term and short-term exposure to ozone to specific health ailments; other studies have linked air pollution to death rates in certain areas, or have begun to assess the negative impact of air pollution on health care costs and economic productivity.

We support a more stringent 8-hour ozone exposure standard which would better protect our health.

To view CAB’s comments to EPA, click here CAB comment ozone 2015

For more information from EPA, go to http://www.epa.gov/groundlevelozone/actions.html

AIR QUALITY ACTION DAY HAS BEEN DECLARED FOR SUSQUEHANNA VALLEY ON FRIDAY, JAN 23

 The Department of Environmental Protection has declared an air quality action day for Jan.23.
Tomorrow’s Forecast
Friday, Jan 23: 110 AQI Unhealthy for Sensitive Groups Particle Pollution (2.5 microns)

Extended Forecast
Saturday, Jan 24: 81 AQI Moderate Particle Pollution (2.5 microns)
Current conditions: Clouds and fog are breaking up across the region as of 1 p.m. EST this Thursday afternoon. High pressure will slowly build into the area overnight tonight into Friday. We are concerned about very light winds near the surface as the high builds in with very little mixing expected. In addition, temperature inversions are likely to trap PM2.5 close to the ground. So for tonight, expect some clearing skies with very light winds. Fine particulate will increase into the code ORANGE range later on tonight as the temperature inversion develops. Low temperatures close to 20 degrees. Friday’s forecast: A PM2.5 Action Day will be declared for the day Friday as very light winds and some warming aloft will bring any mixing in the boundary layer to a halt. Code ORANGE concentrations of fine particulate are likely with this scenario. With some sunshine, afternoon temperatures will recover into the middle 30s. A storm system coming out of the deep South will then move northeastward towards us Friday night into Saturday, and with the current forecast track, we could be in line for a quick inch or so of snow during this period. Precipitation could briefly turn to a bit of rain by later Saturday morning as temperatures creep just above the freezing mark. While atmospheric mixing will be a little greater on Saturday, fine particulate concentrations will remain well into the moderate range. *** Extended forecast: The weather pattern will continue to be an active one as we move into the early part of next week. A clipper system will move eastward and affect the area later Sunday night into Monday with snow. Because the low is expected to track more to the south, precipitation could fall as all snow as cold air remains in place. Following this, a large area of high pressure builds in for Tuesday into Wednesday of next week with dry weather and light winds. Low moderate levels of PM will occur Sunday into Monday, but with high pressure building in next week with existing snow cover, we have to again be concerned with stronger inversions trapping fine particulates close to the ground.–McAuliffe

Climate Change – It’s About Carbon

Our next Clean Air Board community meeting will be held on Feb. 5, 7 pm.

Join us as we meet with Dr. Mort Rubenstein and Mr. Michael Mark from the Citizens Climate Lobby.  They will discuss “Climate Change: It’s About Carbon!”

Location: Second Presbyterian Church, 528 Garland Drive, Carlisle.

The New York Times reports on air pollution in major cities

A review of air pollution levels in the world’s largest cities.
http://nyti.ms/1CoXYdZ

Pollution Around the World: A Matter of Choices
Europe’s level of pollution may surprise some people, but it all comes down to a society’s priorities.

DEP to hold listening session on EPA Clean Power rule

The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) will hold a listening session Thursday, September 25 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. to hear what you think of the US Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Clean Power Rule. This rule will limit carbon pollution from the nation’s power plants by 30% by 2030. The rule will require states to develop plans to reduce carbon intensity from electric generation plants. In July, EPA held public hearings in Pittsburgh on how to implement the rule.

The Clean Air Board recently sponsored a forum at Dickinson College to discuss the issues raised the EPA proposed rule. At that forum, DEP Deputy Secretary Vince Brisini presented his views on the proposed rule.

Now you have the opportunity to inform DEP of your views on reducing carbon emissions. Please sign up to speak at the DEP listening session.
You can register for the listening session by contacting DEP’s Tammey Adams at 717-772-2725 or taadams@pa.gov.

Getting Pennsylvania on board EPA’s plan to reduce Power Plant Carbon Emissions

EPA recently held public hearings on reducing the nation’s carbon emission from power plants by 30% by 2030. The Clean Air Board is sponsoring a forum to discuss the issues raised the EPA plan. Professor Michael Heiman (Dickinson College) will discuss the merits of the plan, followed by a panel discussion and questions and answers.

The talk will cover: How to Balance Effectiveness, Efficiency, and Equity. Why the Obama Administration Choose Direct Regulation to Address Carbon Emissions. What are Pennsylvania’s Options for Meeting the EPA’s Mandate? Professor Heiman will address the historic and current challenge in reducing carbon emissions to combat climate change. A panel of local experts will address the options Pennsylvania has to meet EPA’s targets.

Sept. 4, 7 pm. Dickinson College – Stafford Auditorium (Rector Science Complex), 301 W. Louther Street, Carlisle, PA
The community is invited. Parking is available across Louther Street by the Library.

To comment on the EPA rule, please follow this link: http://www2.epa.gov/carbon-pollution-standards/clean-power-plan-proposed-rule-comment-guide

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 47 other followers