• Please join us for the CAB Community Meeting, usually held on the first Thursday of every month at 7:00PM. Please check Posts for speaker information, time, and location.

    Community meetings are generally held at Second Presbyterian Church, 528 Garland Drive, Carlisle, PA

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Governor Wolf Announces $118 Million Volkswagen Settlement to Fund New Air Pollution Reduction Program

Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf today announced the roll out of new grant and rebate programs to improve air quality in Pennsylvania funded by the $118 million settlement with Volkswagen Group of America, Pennsylvania’s share of the settlement for allegations of cheating on U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) emissions tests.

The new initiative, Driving PA Forward, is aimed at permanently reducing nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions statewide by as much as 27,700 tons overall by accelerating the replacement of older, polluting diesel engines with cleaner technologies.
Emissions from diesel engines in trucks, buses, forklifts, and other transportation equipment account for over 25 percent of the NOx emissions in Pennsylvania. These emissions contribute to ground-level ozone, leading to poorer air quality and health impacts, especially for children and the elderly.”

Diesel emissions also include fine particulate matter (PM 2.5), which can lead to health problems such as asthma and worsen medical issues such as heart and lung disease and emphysema.
“Reducing smog and particle pollution is essential to maintaining healthy communities,” said Department of Health Secretary Rachel Levine. “More than 380,000 children in Pennsylvania have asthma – something that is exacerbated by air pollution from diesel emissions. These grants and rebates will cut down on those emissions and help everyone breathe a little easier.”

Eight grant and rebate programs will be available over the next five years, with as much as $39 million available for disbursement in year one. Programs will be rolled out throughout 2018.

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Smog Alerts Coming

Summer will soon be here and that can mean high levels of air pollutants in our air, specifically ozone and small particles, commonly known as smog.

Meteorologists declare “Air Quality Action” days when they project that weather conditions are conducive for unhealthy air pollution. In 2016, the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) called six action days for the Susquehanna Valley.

We should heed those warnings. Recent scientific studies conclude that short-term exposure to unhealthy air pollution can have significant adverse effects on pregnant women, children, the elderly, and even the general population–especially those with pre-existing conditions such as asthma. Short term symptoms resulting from breathing high levels of ozone and fine particulate are chest pain, coughing, nausea, throat irritation, and congestion. These pollutants also aggravate bronchitis, heart disease, emphysema, and asthma—and can increase risks of stroke. Children, senior citizens, and those with asthma or other respiratory problems are urged to limit outdoor activities when an action day is predicted.

Air Quality Action days are often declared when there is little wind and when the amount of ozone or particles in stagnant air could exceed federal health standards. The DEP monitors local and regional air quality. Local television and radio stations alert the public when an Air Quality Action day is predicted. Check your newspaper’s websites as well. The Clean Air Board of Central Pennsylvania also monitors pollution levels and posts notices at this website when DEP declares an Air Quality Action day.  Stay informed!

What Central Pennsylvania Can Learn from California’s History of Air Pollution Control

During the 1950s, Los Angeles became one of the nation’s pacesetters in responding to air pollution. Massive public protests alarmed business leaders, who tried to diffuse the
crisis with a major public relations campaign that celebrated science and technology, while blaming cars and carmakers.
Join historian Roger Turner for a talk that uses fascinating period photos to tell this story, and then explores what lessons we can learn for fighting air pollution today.

Join us on May 3, 2018, 7 pm at the Bosler Memorial Library,

158 West High St., Carlisle, PA 17013.  Light refreshments will be served.

Sponsored by the Clean Air Board and the Science History Institute

 

Protecting Our Children from Environmental Hazards, April 5

Claire Hawks

Illustration by Claire Hawks
Artworks! Art Teacher at Carlisle Arts Learning Center Talia Amorosano

What is in the air we breathe and are in the household products we use every day?

Two local doctors will discuss the vulnerability of children and the elderly to environmental toxins and how we can protect them and ourselves

Katarzyna Ferraro, MD, double board certified in emergency medicine and integrative medicine, treats complex medical problems in children and adults, including childhood developmental delays and autism.

Craig Jurgensen, MD is a retired neurologist with 30+ years of experience working with complex neurological conditions like Alzheimer’s dementia and Parkinson’s; he has a special interest in air pollution on neurological function and health.

Thursday, April 5 at 7 pm

Second Presbyterian Church, 528 Garland Drive, Carlisle

Childcare will be provided

The Clean Power Plan – Where is it now?

PPL Brunner Island stack

What is going on with the 2015 EPA Clean Power Plan?  The Clean Air Board will discuss the current status of the EPA’s Clean Power Plan.  President Trump has announced his intention to repeal the plan.  Can he do so?   EPA is holding listening sessions and will keep open a public comment period until April 26, 2018.   Learn more about the current status and the contentious issues.

Join us at the Clean Air Board community meeting  – 7 pm  March 1, 2018, Second Presbyterian Church, 528 Garland Drive, Carlisle, PA  17013

Beyond Politics: The Private Governance Response to Climate Change

Professor Michael Vandenbergh of Vanderbilt Law School will be speaking at Widener University Commonwealth Law School on Friday, Feb. 9, at noon (bring along your lunch), in Room A180 of the Administration Building3737 Vartan Way, Harrisburg, Pa., about a topic that could help reduce current political partisanship on climate change.  He will explain how private companies, on their own, can reduce carbon dioxide emissions by a billion tons per year over the next decade.  
 
The talk is based on a new book, Michael P. Vandenbergh & Jonathan M. Gilligan, Beyond Politics: The Private Governance Response to Climate Change (Cambridge University Press 2017).
 
He will explain that private sector action provides one of the most promising opportunities to reduce the risks of climate change, buying time while governments move slowly or oppose climate mitigation. Starting with the insight that much of the resistance to climate mitigation is grounded in concern about the role of government, the talk will draw on law, policy, social science and climate science to demonstrate how private initiatives are already bypassing government inaction in the United States and around the globe. 
 
The talk will combine an examination of the growth of private climate initiatives over the last decade, a theory of why private actors are motivated to reduce emissions, and a review of viable next steps.
 
This is an important talk about an important topic.  The program is free and open to all the Widener community and to the public. In addition, one free CLE (substantive) credit is available. Registration is not necessary.
 
A campus map, showing the administration building, is available here:  https://commonwealthlaw.widener.edu/current-students/resources-for-current-students/campus-map/
 

Why Drive An Electric Car?

The Clean Air Board will be meeting on Feb. 1, 7 pm to discuss the future of electric vehicles.  Why drive an electric car?  We will discuss this question with Felix Edem, a representative from Brenner Nissan in Mechanicsburg, PA.

Electric vehicles will become commonplace in the near future.  CAB has been participating in the Drive Electric PA Coalition meetings with PennDOT, the PUC and PA DEP.  https://driveelectricpa.org/  At the last meeting of the coalition, Nissan manufacturer representatives talked a bit about the 2018 Nissan Leaf, a zero emissions vehicle that can travel 150 miles on a single charge.

2018 Nissan Leaf

Image from GreenCarsReports,com

CAB meets at the Second Presbyterian Church, 528 Garland Drive, Carlisle, PA.  For directions, click here