• Please join us for the CAB Community Meeting, usually held on the first Thursday of every month at 7:00PM. Please check Posts for speaker information, time, and location.

    Community meetings are generally held at Second Presbyterian Church, 528 Garland Drive, Carlisle, PA

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The Clean Power Plan – Where is it now?

PPL Brunner Island stack

What is going on with the 2015 EPA Clean Power Plan?  The Clean Air Board will discuss the current status of the EPA’s Clean Power Plan.  President Trump has announced his intention to repeal the plan.  Can he do so?   EPA is holding listenings sessions and will keep open a public comment period until April 26, 2018.   Learn more about the current status and the contentious issues.

Join us at the Clean Air Board community meeting  – 7 pm  March 1, 2018, Second Presbyterian Church, 528 Garland Drive, Carlisle, PA  17013

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Beyond Politics: The Private Governance Response to Climate Change

Professor Michael Vandenbergh of Vanderbilt Law School will be speaking at Widener University Commonwealth Law School on Friday, Feb. 9, at noon (bring along your lunch), in Room A180 of the Administration Building3737 Vartan Way, Harrisburg, Pa., about a topic that could help reduce current political partisanship on climate change.  He will explain how private companies, on their own, can reduce carbon dioxide emissions by a billion tons per year over the next decade.  
 
The talk is based on a new book, Michael P. Vandenbergh & Jonathan M. Gilligan, Beyond Politics: The Private Governance Response to Climate Change (Cambridge University Press 2017).
 
He will explain that private sector action provides one of the most promising opportunities to reduce the risks of climate change, buying time while governments move slowly or oppose climate mitigation. Starting with the insight that much of the resistance to climate mitigation is grounded in concern about the role of government, the talk will draw on law, policy, social science and climate science to demonstrate how private initiatives are already bypassing government inaction in the United States and around the globe. 
 
The talk will combine an examination of the growth of private climate initiatives over the last decade, a theory of why private actors are motivated to reduce emissions, and a review of viable next steps.
 
This is an important talk about an important topic.  The program is free and open to all the Widener community and to the public. In addition, one free CLE (substantive) credit is available. Registration is not necessary.
 
A campus map, showing the administration building, is available here:  https://commonwealthlaw.widener.edu/current-students/resources-for-current-students/campus-map/
 

Why Drive An Electric Car?

The Clean Air Board will be meeting on Feb. 1, 7 pm to discuss the future of electric vehicles.  Why drive an electric car?  We will discuss this question with Felix Edem, a representative from Brenner Nissan in Mechanicsburg, PA.

Electric vehicles will become commonplace in the near future.  CAB has been participating in the Drive Electric PA Coalition meetings with PennDOT, the PUC and PA DEP.  https://driveelectricpa.org/  At the last meeting of the coalition, Nissan manufacturer representatives talked a bit about the 2018 Nissan Leaf, a zero emissions vehicle that can travel 150 miles on a single charge.

2018 Nissan Leaf

Image from GreenCarsReports,com

CAB meets at the Second Presbyterian Church, 528 Garland Drive, Carlisle, PA.  For directions, click here

 

No CAB meeting on Jan. 4, 2018

There will be no Clean Air Board meeting on Jan. 4.   CAB’s next meeting will be Feb. 1.

The Journal of the American Medical Association has published a new study on deaths associated with air pollution.   The New York Times reported on this study.

“The researchers found that for each day-to-day increase of 10 micrograms per square meter in fine particulate matter (PM 2.5), the small particles of soot that easily enter the lungs and bloodstream, there was a 1.05 percent increase in deaths. For each 10 parts per billion increase in ozone, a main component of smog, there was a 0.51 percent increase.”

Read more …

 

 

EPA proposes to exempt certain glider trucks from emissions standards

In November 2017, the Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt proposed a rule to repeal tighter emissions standards for heavy-duty trucks with older engines.  The regulation is aimed at controlling soot and other pollutants.

The current rule applies emissions standards for heavy-duty trucks to new truck components called gliders and trailers. A glider, or body, is the front of a truck, including the cab, which fits over the engine.  Under EPA’s new proposal, companies would be allowed to install an outdated engine into a new truck body and avoid regulations that would apply to an entirely new truck.

The Washington Post reports that executives from three major heavy-truck and engine manufacturers — Volvo Group North America, Cummins and Navistar — wrote Pruitt urging him not to reopen the rule. It noted that the three companies were joining with the Truck and Engine Manufacturers Association, the American Trucking Associations and the Truck Rental and Leasing Association in “voicing their concerns” about the move.

Glen Kedzie, vice president and energy and environmental counsel for American Trucking Associations, said at an EPA hearing that by EPA’s own admission, glider vehicles may account for as much as 33% of total NOx emissions from all heavy-duty on-highway vehicles by 2025 if left unchecked.

ATA opposes a repeal of the glider provision, Kedzie said.

“It is well-known that gliders are purchased to save money, avoid maintenance costs and weight penalties, skirt federal excise tax payments, elude the use of engine technologies that virtually eliminate NOx and PM emissions, and to avoid the installation of safety equipment in pre-2000 vehicles under the electronic logging device rule which goes into effect Dec. 18,” Kedzie told EPA officials.

The full proposal can be found in the Federal Register.

Comments must be submitted Jan. 5, 2008 and may be submitted by clicking the submit a formal comment tab on the Federal Register page.

 

CAB’s Year in Review

Join Clean Air Board members as we look back at highlights of 2017.   On Dec. 7, we will go over past events, new scientific findings, and insights from our work in the community.

Some of the questions asked and answered this past year:

Are bees allergic to air pollution?

Do trees remove pollutants?

Does air pollution affect brain activity?

Where do we rank nationally among clean air metro areas?

How can we use the VW penalty fund to reduce diesel pollution?

What will rural Cumberland County look like in the future?

How will climate change affect our air?

Will the Clean Air Act or a Climate bill save us?

Meet with us on Dec. 7, 7:00 pm at Second Presbyterian Church, 528 Garland Drive, Carlisle, PA  17013.  Bring your questions and curiosity.  Light refreshments will be served.

 

Southern California smog worsens for second straight year despite reduced emissions

For decades, Southern California has waged a slow but successful war on smog. Through vehicle emissions rules, clean-fuel standards and other tough measures, officials have lifted the choking pall of air pollution that once shrouded Los Angeles, bringing clearer skies and healthier lungs.

But now, progress appears to be faltering. Smog has gotten worse for the second straight year, even though emissions are on the decline.

Read more